Thursday, 10 January 2013

Model Expressions And Poses

Source(google.com.pk)
Model Expressions And Poses Biography

You can work on facial expressions by practising them in a mirror. Everything you feel is reflected in your face, and models need to be adept at projecting all the major emotions. Make a list of key emotions (love, hate, sorrow, joy etc.) and practise expressing each emotion in front of a mirror. After you have practised for a while, try out your skills on a friend and see if they can tell what emotion you are conveying.You can practise posing in front of a full-length mirror. Check out some fashion catalogues to find the most popular poses. Pay attention to the tilt of the head, the position of the hands and the turn of the ankle. These little things can make a big difference - just as with facial expressions, your body posture can convey a variety of emotions. Consider taking up activities that teach you how to move your body gracefully. Dancers and gymnasts move well in front of the camera because they know how to create long sweeping lines with their bodies.Both facial expressions and poses can be improved by practising with props, products and wardrobe. Examples of props could be a floppy hat, a long shawl or a beach ball. The idea is to practise using and reacting to the prop.Since one of the key areas of modelling is promotional and marketing work, it is a good idea to practise with a product that might be sold - a perfume, household product or foodstuff, for example. Practise holding the product so it may be clearly seen and you don't cover the label.
In fashion shoots, you'll be selling clothes, so practise showing the important features of each item. Show off the pockets, collar and belt or how the garment moves. You need to bring attention to whatever makes the garment interesting.I apologize that all the pictures are of me; I’d love to add some kindly donated pics of other cosplayers in the future. But I can’t just go stealing other people’s photos willy-nilly. :P
Disclaimer #2: I’m being candid here, and I feel like a moron, but I’m going to make an example of myself and maybe my lameness will help someone out. I’m not an expert or professional. I’m just a normal girl who wishes I had something like this when I started cosplaying.
I break photos down into 2 categories. The first is the controlled photoshoot, where you are one-on-one with your photographer in an ideal setting. Photos in a controlled invironment are a collaboration between you and your (hopefully) experienced photographer. They are more invested in finding a flattering angle of you, so you can take more risks with posing and concentrate on the mood of the photo.
The second type is posing in an uncontrolled invironment, i.e. the convention floor. I wrote this page for this second, more chaotic type. The average people taking your photo at cons aren’t photographers. They’re fans. They point and shoot (sometimes they’re even still walking!), and don’t give a crap about lighting, whether or not you blinked, or what angle they’re coming at you at. So you have to work for them to give them a good photo. (And indirectly give yourself a good photo, when you find it later on the internet!) When someone asks for a photo, you know what looks okay and at what best angle, and you just brainlessly smile your guts out (if applicable) and STRIKE THAT POSE.You have a crazy outfit, neon spiky hair, and… where’s that face? It gets washed out if you don’t balance it with at least a little something to make your expressions pop. I’m not talking hoochie makeup. I am talking minimal: face powder, foundation (or foundation just on blemishes/red areas to even out skintone). If you’re a guy, you might just think makeup’s whack. Well, check that ego at the door, because at a convention, in costume, it’s more theatrical than anything. No one is going to bully you for wearing a little cover up and maybe a smidge of eyeliner. And if they are, they’re the same jerks who are going to make fun of you for wearing that stupid costume you already have on. Besides, I hear some emo rock stars wear makeup these days, I don’t know, I’m old. King Leonidas wore makeup in that one movie. And he’s a man’s man. Dang. I digress.Unless you spent 2 hours blowdrying it to perfection, chances are a wig is still going to be fuller and require less fussing throughout the day. Also, if you ever want to change your hairstyle, you won’t be able to wear that costume accurately again. So a wig is a good costume investment. If your hair is nothing like the characters, the best way to improve your overall costume immediately is with a wig! Think about it – in the anime world, every character has pretty much the same face as the next. They have those crazy hairstyles and eye colors just so you can tell them apart. It’s just as important as the outfit they are wearing, and since your head is going to be in every picture, pay MORE attention to it, not LESS! Hair can make or break an outfit.I have seen countless photos of sweet costumes where the wearer just looks bored, or tired, or deadpan. I know, it’s all about the costume, right? Who cares what the model looks like? Well then, I am shaking you and telling you it matters. I look at cosplay as being both the costume (cos), and also playing the character (play). Having a simple pose, but just the facial expressions of your character can take a “nice costume” photo to “wow, you really capture the character! Just like him/her!”. And it only takes a second to do before a photograph, basically zero effort especially if you are fully enjoying wearing that costume. Getting in character requires a bit of forced ego, sometimes. Once you cosplay a couple times you become less self-conscious, and might even gain some confidence.Look slightly above the lens, as this reduces red eye. Red eye is actually a reflection of the blood vessels in your eye that occurs when the flash is located close to the camera lens, as in most cameras with a built-in flash. GROSS. Looking above the camera changes the angle the flash bounces from your eye back to the lens, so you have a good chance at reducing red-eye. (Unless your character has red eyes, then stare away.This adds some interesting angles, and also helps you look thinner like those impossibly tiny-waisted anime characters. Your legs should be slightly crossing over one another like in this picture, with most of the weight on the back leg giving the illusion of thin, long legs (instead of two identical stumps). This works for dudes, too. (Or crossplaying gals.) For guys, it’s best if the feet aren’t quite as turned out. This pose is universally flattering and is historically called contrapposto, and while the Greeks don’t have a patent on standing, they sure used it in a lot of fancy statues. Greeks and architecture and beauty all seem to go hand in hand throughout history, so I guess general consensus dictates that this is a good pose!Practice posing in front of a full length mirror. Regular clothes is fine, but something tight, like your undies, allows you to see as much as your body as possible, even if it’s going to be covered up in costume. Might as well glean as much visual information as you can. Don’t forget to practice your facial expressions as well. Try holding it your head at different angles, or look at old photos of you and decide to make that face/never make that face again. Until I cosplayed, I never had a reason to practice posing, and I never did. When I started cosplay, I invested some time with the mirror; not because I think I’m a “model”, but because I was proud of my creations and wanted to show them off in the best light. I owed my costumes at least that much respect, even though it was mortifying. Scrutinizing myself in a mirror was awkward and sort of depressing at first. It feels silly, but you might as well go for it because you only stand to gain from it. Then, if you get really brave (or drunk), put on some awesome music related to your characters and make music-video model love to that mirror, babay! And send me a video, so I can laugh at you. Having a sense of humor with yourself and being a goofball JUST MIGHT translate into tapping into your latent acting and model skills. Actually, I’m pretty sure it will.I don’t consider myself the epitome of the human figure and grace by any means. Posture goes a lot of places natural beauty can’t. I’ve seen unbelievably gorgeous boys and girls; every-day people, not just costumers – their natural beauty utterly ruined by their hideous posture and lack of self awareness. (Sometimes that makes me feel good in an evil way.) Likewise, I’m sure you’ve seen average looking people but there’s still ‘something about them’ that makes them cool in your eyes, despite what they’re wearing or their hairstyle or looks or how much they weigh. What they have is money. No. Kidding! Money doesn’t matter – they are rich in confidence and good posture. Oh my god, someone give me my CHEESE award right now. That was amazingly lame. The most awesome part about good posture is that this is a gift you can give yourself if God chose to jip you in the looks department, or so you think. :P And you can use good posture everyday!Once you get confident in a mirror, try having a friend take a couple dozen pictures of you trying out your poses. This is where you can refine your techniques you’ve practiced; heck, make an exercise out of it with your cosplay buddies. Have a posing mini-workshop, grab someone’s digital camera, and snap pictures of each other, and then delete them all before anyone else sees. This will teach you how to orient yourself in front of a lens without a mirror.
Finally, always practice your poses with your costume on! Before you leave your hotel room, or first thing when you get to a con, go to the bathroom and find a full-length mirror. Posing in different shoes, wigs, corsets, long flowy robes etc. is always different than doing it at home in sweats. But by this point, you have the basics, so this should be the fun part instead of the agonizing part! On a final note, don’t feel bad if most of your pictures look bad. Professional photographers and models take hundreds of pictures for that one special shot. If it takes the professionals a few hundred tries for that ONE image, feel blessed to have a I've shared it on a group for our big British convention London Expo as quite often i've seen some fantastic costumes let down by the bad pose, or lack of. As you said cosplay is about costume and play ( or performance) It's about becoming that character for the few seconds the photos are being taken. Example. When i did Asajj Ventress from star wars and people asked me for a photo, i never smiled, i simply beckoned them over and did a suitable pose with them. When they said thanks (which i always appreciate) i would nod ( ala T'ealc from Sg1) to them as thanks. They always said to my non costuming friend how i was in character and it was more than just a person in costume and they liked that. Of course playing someone so evil, you have to pull back on the evilness unless you want to be thrown out of an event! Loving the new website btw!

Model Expressions And Poses
Model Expressions And Poses
Model Expressions And Poses
Model Expressions And Poses
Model Expressions And Poses
Model Expressions And Poses
Model Expressions And Poses
Model Expressions And Poses
Model Expressions And Poses
Model Expressions And Poses
Model Expressions And Poses

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